October’s New Arrivals to the Children’s Section

 

 This is How We Do It: One Day in the Life of Seven Kids from around the World   by Matt Lamothe

Building on the “Global Community”, Lamothe invites children to wonder what children far away in another country do during their day.  The beautiful illustrations of the book help children learn that there are many common shared experiences throughout the world. Visit Japan, Italy, and Peru to name a few. It’s a wonderful book for discussion.  Pair it with maps, music and cuisine from a select country to create a unique cultural experience for the family.

 

 

Welcome: A Mo Willems Guide for New Arrivals by Mo Willems

Bold graphics make Willems’ expressions pop.  Parents and children will delight in welcoming the newest family member into the lap of reading.  The book is oodles of fun, and filled with lighthearted messages.  Some adults might get a bit misty eyed, but all will close the book with a smile and a general warm hug.  This is a great book addition on any home bookshelf.

 

 

A Walk in the Forest by Maria Dek

Simple elegance.  Dek’s watercolor illustrations let the undeniable magic of the forest and all it holds step lightly into your imagination.  Talk a walk through this book and feast on the possibilities for gathering, feathers, leaves, pinecones, beautiful stones.  Imagine forests you’ve never seen before.  What would they look like, who would live there?  What smells and colors and sounds do you experience? Welcome the opportunity for imaginative play.

 

 

 7 ate 9 by Tara Lazar

I simply cannot compete with these reviews….why punish myself?   So here they are:

“The solution to the mystery is pretty clever, the pace is brisk, and the arithmetic jokes approach infinity. Lazar’s numbers game stands up to repeat readalouds.” 
~ Publisher’s Weekly 

“The newly numerate [will] find the goings-on hilarious. You can count on it.”
~ The Horn Book

“Pun fun reigns over this fast-paced whodunit. Counting has never been so mysterious or so much fun.” 
~ Kirkus Reviews